Education and the Requirements of the GCC Labor Market

Author/s: several co-authors
1st Edition Year: 2010
Edition: First edition
Language: English
Available Languages: العربية
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Description

The GCC countries today face a gap between educational output and labor market requirements. These countries enjoy substantial incomes and therefore spend generously on education, resulting in impressive levels of educational penetration among their populations within only a few decades, and have also achieved admirable levels of gender equality across the various stages of the education system. Yet returns on investment in education in the GCC countries are low. The proposed solution has been to re-create the experiences of other countries in developing their education systems and to encourage foreign universities and institutions to become established in the region—measures which have thus far proven inadequate in addressing the GCC’s educational deficiencies.

To discuss the relationship between education and the labor market in the Arabian Gulf, the Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research (ECSSR) convened its 15th Annual Conference under the title Education and the Requirements of the GCC Labor Market on February 1–3, 2010 in Abu Dhabi, UAE, hosting a group of distinguished experts from various academic and professional backgrounds. This book comprises a collection of the papers presented at the conference, and as such provides a scholarly examination of the scale of the current dilemma; methods with which to monitor its indicators—such as population growth rates, the spread of education, foreign labor force concerns, and unemployment; variables of education–labor market dynamics in an international context; and case studies of the relationship between education and the labor market in selected GCC countries, including a review of the various related strategies and policies adopted by these countries—particularly those concerned with labor force nationalization and encouraging greater integration of citizens into the private sector.

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