No. 620

The End of the Rentier State Era in the Arab World

  • 3 October 2018

In recent years, the region has faced the challenge of the “Arab Spring,” which has been responsible for the collapse of the old social contracts in the Arab world. The social contract in the Arab world is based on two axes: political and economic, where the countries are committed, on the economic and social level, to providing the basic services for citizens, including education, healthcare, and other services. The countries are committed to subsidizing basic commodities like bread and fuel in addition to taking responsibility as the main employer for the workforce. In return, the citizens will accept their weak political representation. When the size of the public sector increased in these countries and they became unable to provide the same quality of services, in light of insisting on the absence or weak political representation, these social contracts collapsed and some of the Arab regimes collapsed accordingly. The region is facing a new challenge in terms of the fall of oil prices, possibly for good, which is a development to be considered as a sign of the end of the rentier state for both oil-exporting and oil-importing countries. This lecture tried to answer questions about how states in the region will adapt themselves to such developments. It examined whether these states are going to be able to transfer from the rentier state model to the producing state model through only economic development or if there is need for new social contracts, which will increase the political representation of citizens.

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LECTURER

Wednesday 3 October 2018

7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Wednesday 3 October 2018

7:30 pm - 8:30 pm