Do Political Religious Groups Possess Applicable Development Plans? The Case of the Muslim Brotherhood.. Insights from The Mirage

Do Political Religious Groups Possess Applicable Development Plans? The Case of the Muslim Brotherhood.. Insights from The Mirage

  • 30 December 2015

Despite the arguments presented by contemporary political religious groups, such entities, regardless of their varying intellectual and political positions, do not possess any practical plans for development, either in theory or in practice.

Three main structural factors form the basis of the various intellectual and political positions they have adopted:

1. Ideology
Political religious groups are governed by a religious ideology that promotes the idea of Islam as the ultimate solution. Such groups believe that once they have established a state built on the tenets of Islam, as they interpret it, all socio-economic problems will subsequently be resolved. The implication is that the development process is effectively on hold until they have arrived at a position of authority.
2. History
These groups are preoccupied with the past, as evidenced by their aspirations to reinstate the caliphate system—the authority of which is intended to transcend state boundaries the world over. They are not concerned with the construction of future development projects, nor do they believe in any alternative, scientific based solutions to socio-economic, development problems, such as unemployment and lack of investment. Their dismissal of such notions is premised on the belief that Islamic heritage provides relevant solutions to the problems faced by contemporary Arab and Islamic societies.
3. Reactionary mind-set
All these political–religious entities, including the parent organization (i.e. the Muslim Brotherhood), are governed by a reactionary mind-set. Reactionary approaches focus on the demolition of existing structures rather than offering constructive solutions that rectify discernible areas of weakness. They are characterized by imbalanced, irrational and extreme modes of thought, in addition to being fuelled by sentiments of fear, hatred and revenge.

These three factors outlined above help to consign any plans for development that are held by political religious groups to failure.

Examples of failed attempts at development among Islamist groups include:
1. The Wilayat al-Faqih system in Iran.
2. The National Islamic Front in Sudan.
3. Hamas in Gaza.
4. The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.

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Wednesday 30 December 2015

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Wednesday 30 December 2015

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