From Edward Said and Orientalism to the Arab Spring

From Edward Said and Orientalism to the Arab Spring

  • 30 September 2015

This lecture built upon key intellectual debates that were held in the Western world during the second half of the twentieth century, which focused on the nature of Muslims, Arabs, and their capacity to change and their receptiveness to democracy, both as a viable political system and way of life. The “Arab Spring” and the Arab youth have effectively ended the debate once and for all, illustrating that Arabs, like other human beings, crave a better life and central to this underlying aspiration is the thirst for democracy. Like many others before them, Arabs have embraced the prospect of democracy when circumstances converged to raise the possibility of such an outcome coming to pass. They have revolted when the ruling regimes had seemingly blocked all paths to such a development.

The lecture also examined the role of certain sections of society that were previously marginalized from the public domain. These members of society have since taken up the reins with regards to offering notable support to each and every individual that aspires to live a dignified life. Among these formerly disadvantaged groups include women, children and ethnic minorities. Arab societies have displayed an adept ability to mobilize themselves and have full embraced the idea of building a modern, pluralistic socio-political system. This reality can be seen across the region, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf.

Lecture Video

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Wednesday 30 September 2015

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Wednesday 30 September 2015

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