Political Geography of Violence in Yemen

Political Geography of Violence in Yemen

  • 29 April 2014

Yemen is the weakest link in the chain of the GCC’s security. Years before the arrival of the effects of the Arab Spring on Yemen in early 2011, analysts had repeatedly warned of the potential for the country to become another Afghanistan or Somalia. The scenario of a collapsed state on the doorstep of Saudi Arabia, and along the northern shore of the strategic Gulf of Aden and the Strait of Bab el-Mandab, is a nightmare not only for the population of Yemen but also for regional and international security.

Today, three years after the eruption of anti-regime popular uprisings, the fragile Yemeni state has been weakened further; the military remains dangerously divided; entrepreneurs of violence have expanded their geographical influence; sectarian­ism has taken a violent turn; and the shortage of basic public goods and law and order has become severe. The most worrisome consequences can be found in the northern, eastern and southern provinces of the country, where armed non-state actors have flourished and many districts have turned into a poisonous cocktail combining the explosive ingredients of Iraq, Somalia and Afghanistan. Drawing from many years of field research in Yemen, Dr. Fattah will shed light on the interactions between space, place, non-state actors and violence in the country. In light of the outcomes of the ten months-long national dialogue conference, which brought together 565 delegates representing a wide array of parties and social groups, this lecture will conclude by pointing to vital steps that should be taken to prevent Yemen descending into total anarchy.

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LECTURER

Tuesday 29 April 2014

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Tuesday 29 April 2014

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