US Intelligence Since September 11: Closing the Gaps

US Intelligence Since September 11: Closing the Gaps

  • 27 July 2003

Ellen Laipson reviewed the current debate on the
intelligence system, particularly that, since the attacks of
September 11, US intelligence and its contribution to US
national security has been under intense scrutiny. The
Bush Administration’s use of intelligence to support its case
for war against Iraq has compounded the press, public,
and congressional questioning of the value and purpose
of US intelligence. This lecture explored the ongoing
debate and summarized various ideas for reforming
intelligence bureaucracy and methods within the context
of American politics and the changing priorities of US
national security. With respect to improving intelligence
performance amidst the threat of terrorism, the lecture
considered the need to work the terrorist target as an
immediate operational target at the strategic level. It also
discussed issues related to workforce changes that have
been necessary to bring the right skills to the task and
how to promote more effective inter-agency cooperation.
Concerning the war in Iraq, the presentation addressed
intelligence support to the policy process prior to the
decision to go to war, intelligence support to the war
fighter, coalition issues, and intelligence- sharing beyond
the United States. The debate over weapons of mass
destruction was also included. More strategically, it is
important to consider some of the enduring dilemmas
that face a transparent, open and information-rich society
and how intelligence and secrecy fit into public policymaking.
The presentation reflected on intelligence in
the age of globalization and how to rethink information
and intelligence needs in an increasingly interdependent
world.

Share

LECTURER

Sunday 27 July 2003

-

Sunday 27 July 2003

-