Conflict in the South Caucasus: Regional and International Contexts

Conflict in the South Caucasus: Regional and International Contexts

  • 26 November 2014

Dr. Gulshan Pashayeva

This lecture was devoted to the mediation efforts regarding the unresolved conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, which is considered the most daunting issue for regional security, peace and cooperation in the South Caucasus.

The thorny path of negotiation around this conflict started more than 20 years ago. Since 1994, when a cease-fire was reached between the parties, many mediation attempts have been made by the OSCE Minsk Group to find a political solution to this conflict; however, no tangible results have been achieved in the negotiation process so far.

The latest developments in Ukraine demonstrate once more the vulnerability of states that encounter a breach of their territorial integrity. Due to Russia’s annexation of Crimea and its continued destabilization of eastern Ukraine, a number of sanctions have been imposed against Russia by the EU and the US in recent months.

A considerable part of the internationally recognized territories of Azerbaijan are currently not under the control of the state, and around a million people have become refugees and IDPs as a direct consequence of this conflict.

The geopolitical situation has changed noticeably since the Ukraine crisis and more mediation efforts to solve the Armenian–Azerbaijani conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh have been made. However, some differences still exist between the conflicting parties that render the negotiation process inconclusive, putting serious obstacles in the way of achieving a long-awaited breakthrough. If wide-ranging mediation efforts continue, perhaps it will be possible to reach a comprehensive peace agreement between the parties in the future.

Kamal Gasimov

This lecture focused on the resolutions of the OIC concerning the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. The OIC is the largest organization representing Muslims around the world and is counted as the second largest international organization after the United Nations; hence, the lecture examined whether the OIC can affect the negotiation process concerning the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, and what options the OIC might utilize in its efforts to bring about a solution.

Among the questions pondered during this lecture was the extent to which any resolutions adopted by the OIC are theoretically and practically effective, what kind of position OIC member states (mainly Turkey, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabia and UAE) are taking on Nagorno-Karabakh, and what role they can play in conflict resolution.

The lectures was delivered in the Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan Hall at the ECSSR Office Complex in Abu Dhabi on Wednesday (26 November 2014).

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LECTURER

Wednesday 26 November 2014

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Wednesday 26 November 2014

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