The Globalization of Terror and the Future of the World Order

The Globalization of Terror and the Future of the World Order

  • 25 February 2015

This lecture explored the evolution of terrorism over the last fifteen years and identified lessons for the future. September 11, 2001 acted as a turning point in the globalization of terror – a clear statement that militant extremism can hit anywhere, at any time and cause the highest level of damage and consternation.

Much of the last decade and a half has been dominated by governments’ focus on terrorism and counter-terrorism in response to various major terrorist attacks. This lecture discussed the shift in the form of these attacks from bombings to shootings and stabbings and attempts by governments to respond to this changing ‘terrorscape.’ It also examined how this has affected international cooperation and raised questions regarding the balance between ensuring civil liberties and maintaining national security.

In an era dominated by political and religious conflict, where nations have waged war against extremist ideologies, there has been a shift from symmetrical to asymmetrical conflicts in which religion and foreign policy have often been used as justification. Lord Carlile shared his thoughts on the roles played by religion and foreign policy in the growth of terrorism, and whether they are the true reasons for the globalization of terror or simply excuses used by its fanatical perpetrators.

The lecture provided some concluding thoughts on the rebalancing of the world order and the part this might play in combating the ever present threat of terrorism. It made reference to the future path of the United Nations and discussed how new economic powers in the world should adjust their policies to encourage and facilitate the prosperity, peace and security of people worldwide.

Share

LECTURER

Wednesday 25 February 2015

-

Wednesday 25 February 2015

-