Religion, Ethnicity & Ideological Orientation in Iraq: From Conflict to Integration

Religion, Ethnicity & Ideological Orientation in Iraq: From Conflict to Integration

  • 24 August 2003

Faleh Abdel Jabbar mentioned that Iraqi society is known
for its severe social divisions and ethnic and religious
partitions. He sees that there are two approaches to
examine the Iraqi situation: the first is a ‘forward-looking’
approach that regards the Iraqi society as a heterogeneous
mixture of tribes, sects, and ethnicities that don’t accept
melting into a modern state. The second is a ‘modernityrelated’
approach that regards Iraqi society as divided
into modern strata (low, middle, and high), according
to wealth and education, that clash with one another
on ideological and economic bases. The Iraqi society is,
in actuality, a mixture of these two cases. It has been in
transition – from the first to the second – since the late
19th century. It appears when studying Iraqi society that it
is divided into two parts: modern strata – the wider part
– and traditional strata and groups. In between, there are
groups that have some features of both sections. Iraq is
distinguished by the fact that it entered the era of modern
national state evolution from a relatively modest point of
development. It has, to a large degree, historically been
a state searching for a balanced nation, but today, it is a
nation searching for a balanced state.

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Sunday 24 August 2003

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Sunday 24 August 2003

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