The New World Order in the 21st Century

The New World Order in the 21st Century

  • 18 February 2007

Joschka Fischer said the end of the Cold War saw not
only the fall of the Berlin Wall but also the crumbling
of the foundations of the post-World War II global
order. He pointed out to criticism leveled against Francis
Fukuyama’s theory about the end of history, referring to
the transformations that revealed not only the vulnerability
of the American economy and national security, but also
the vulnerability of an international system and a global
political order whose stability had previously hinged on the
central bipolar conflict between the victors of the Second
World War: the United States and the Soviet Union.
He added that the challenges facing the international
community today are vastly more complex and their
potential consequences are more dangerous to global
stability than during the Cold War period. The necessity
for a new global order with the strength and legitimacy
to combat these challenges has become acutely apparent
in the aftermath of the post 9/11 US war on Iraq. He
asserted that lasting stability and security in the Middle
East is one of the central issues in global politics and will
be one of the foundations of the global political order
of the 21st century. Achieving it, he added, will require a
strategy that can balance the interests of the region’s most
important actors, foresee a modernization of the states of
the Middle East, and above all, tackle the various conflicts
in the region comprehensively. Sustainable success can
only be achieved by a “deliberate and premeditated” return
to multilateralism.

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Sunday 18 February 2007

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Sunday 18 February 2007

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