The Formation of a New Political System for Iraq: The Role of the GCC

The Formation of a New Political System for Iraq: The Role of the GCC

  • 17 June 2003

James A. Russell addressed the role of the GCC
countries in the future form of the Iraqi political system
following the war on Iraq, considering that the regime
change in Baghdad represents the dawn of a new era
in the Gulf. The unfolding transitional process with its
concomitant friction and tension will be felt in all the
countries in the region, and perhaps even beyond. As
neighbors of Iraq, this friction will be felt most acutely
in the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council
(GCC). Nevertheless, the effects of the transition will
also be felt in the capitals and financial markets of the
world. The United States has embarked on an ambitious
project to rebuild a civil society in Iraq and, at the same
time, is launching a program to create a free-trade
zone in the region to spur both economic and political
reform. President Bush has clearly voiced his hope that
democracy will take hold and flourish in the aftermath
of the Iraq war and is prepared to strongly promote
policies that encourage the Gulf States to move in this
direction. The GCC has an opportunity to forcefully
insert itself in a constructive way into the development
of such a new regional framework and to show a
skeptical international community that the organization
can function as a viable vehicle to help manage the
region’s political, economic and military relations.

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LECTURER

Tuesday 17 June 2003

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Tuesday 17 June 2003

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