Domestic and International Law: The Role of the Constitutional Judge

Domestic and International Law: The Role of the Constitutional Judge

  • 11 June 2008

The lecture dealt with the contemporary role of the
International Court of Justice (ICJ), which is the principal,
permanent judicial organ of the United Nations (UN).
It was established at the end of WWII, and is the
successor to the Permanent Court of International Justice
(PCIJ). In this capacity, it shares with the UN the same
purposes stated in Article (1) of its Charter: maintaining
international peace and security. The role of the ICJ
is to settle, in accordance with international law, legal
disputes submitted to it by states and to advise on legal
questions referred to it by authorized UN bodies and
specialized agencies. Recent years have seen an increase
in the number of states coming to the ICJ, with 79 states
engaging in ICJ proceedings in the past decade. The ICJ
has handed down 95 judgments, one-third of which has
been delivered in the last decade. The year 2007 was the
most productive since the establishment of the ICJ, and it
has become possible to ensure the smooth functioning of
the ICJ, thanks to the advanced efficiency measures it has
taken. The ICJ receives contentious issues from all over
the world. States can submit their cases to the ICJ in many
different ways. Cases submitted to the Court often include
– for example – violent conflicts and violations of human
rights and international law. The ICJ also deals with issues
including regional maritime and territorial disputes. The
ICJ can help prevent more deterioration in relationships
between states, as happened in the territorial dispute
between Qatar and Bahrain over the Hawar Islands.

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LECTURER

Wednesday 11 June 2008

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Wednesday 11 June 2008

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