Border Disputes and Means of Resolution According to International Law

Border Disputes and Means of Resolution According to International Law

  • 10 October 2004

The lecture discussed the Qatar–Bahrain territorial
dispute. This case–the longest ever pending before the
International Court of Justice, the “principal judicial
organ of the United Nations” (according to Article 92
of the UN Charter), and its predecessor, the Permanent
Court of International Justice–finally reached its muchawaited
conclusion on March 16, 2001, putting an end to
an even more protracted and bitter territorial, maritime
and insular dispute between these two states.
The first part of the lecture focused briefly on
the grounds of the judgment based on the territorial
and maritime section of the Charter and thereafter
address the contribution of this case to the law related
to territorial and maritime disputes. In this regard, the
Qatar-Bahrain case undoubtedly represents a model
for all states in the region and the world to follow.
Thus, the significance of this case lies not only in the
peaceful settlement of a serious territorial litigation,
but also in the legal rulings that the World Court has
determined and applied to settle a dispute. Furthermore,
the subsequent conduct of the two parties proved their
wisdom and courage. There is no exception whatsoever
to the rule urging nations to settle all disputes by
peaceful means (Article 2, Section 3 of the UN Charter),
and territorial disagreements are often the gravest, since
they strike at the very heart of a people and a nation.

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LECTURER

Sunday 10 October 2004

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Sunday 10 October 2004

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