US Foreign Policy in the Middle East after September 11, 2001

US Foreign Policy in the Middle East after September 11, 2001

  • 9 April 2002

This lecture examined four developments precipitated by
the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States.
First, is the extraordinary realignment of US relationships
in the region and elsewhere. Second, is the growing
pressure from the Bush Administration to end the regime
of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Third, is the complicated
and confused state of US relations with Iran and how
this relates to key items on the American agenda, namely
terrorism, proliferation and regional stability. Fourth is
US policy and the Arab–Israeli conflict.
New strategic realities in the greater Middle East
resulted from the September 11 terrorist attacks and
the US military presence in Central Asia have not been
possible without the consent of Russia. Such presence
reflects the major change in US–Russian relations
since the September 11 attacks. If this new alliance was
destined to carry on despite the presence of a number of
short-term challenges, it is possible to prepare the stage
for the process of re-evaluation of US policy toward the
Caucasus and Central Asia.
Before September 11, Pakistan was increasingly
isolated, almost becoming a pariah state like Iraq and
North Korea. Now we find that the United States has
excellent relations with Pakistan and India. Through
successful military operations against the Taliban, the
US brought a new Afghan regime, and it is hoped that
this regime would be democratic. Following September
11, the lecture also discussed the setbacks experienced in
US–Saudi Arabia relations.

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LECTURER

Tuesday 9 April 2002

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Tuesday 9 April 2002

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