Securing Energy: The Developing Sino-Indian Rivalry in the Indian Ocean

Securing Energy: The Developing Sino-Indian Rivalry in the Indian Ocean

  • 7 November 2007

The lecture discussed energy security in the Indian Ocean
Region where an unprecedented development, the rise of
two large Asian economic giants – China and India – is
taking place simultaneously. The speaker asserted that
the expansion of both countries’ naval forces to defend
“growing maritime interests,” has raised concerns over their
developing naval rivalry in the region. India is concerned
over Chinese assistance in the construction of Gwadar Port
in southern Pakistan and ports and pipelines in Myanmar.
India perceives these activities as an attempt by China to
gain permanent access to the Indian Ocean for the first
time, and encircle India strategically. At the same time,
China has expressed concerns over the activities in the
Indian Ocean of a quadrilateral group of democratic states
– the United States, Japan, Australia and India – and the
growing defense and strategic relationship between India
and the United States. China perceives these activities as an
attempt to contain it. The increased Chinese naval presence
and activities in the Indian Ocean are countered by bilateral
Indian naval exercises with Singapore a Vietnam in the
South China Sea. Both India and China are simultaneously
building defense relations and supplying arms to South
Asian countries. The speaker concluded that to ensure
future stability and security in the Indian Ocean, it will
be critical to build Sino–Indian naval confidence through
maritime and diplomatic cooperation in the region.
Confidence building process could encompass measures
such as the establishment of an official bilateral dialogue on
maritime security, and attempts to cooperate on issues such
as search and rescue (SAR) operations, maritime safety
and security, and marine enviro

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Wednesday 7 November 2007

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Wednesday 7 November 2007

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