The Role of the Gulf Region in the Formation of US National Security Policy

The Role of the Gulf Region in the Formation of US National Security Policy

  • 6 June 2004

Dr. Lawrence Korb saw that US security interests in the
Arabian Gulf must be placed in the context of overall US
national security policy. According to President Bush’s
National Security Strategy (NSS), which was released on
September 17, 2002, the goal of US security policy is to
protect the US and its allies from terrorists, states who
support terrorists, and rogue or outlaw states—the “axis
of evil” states (Iraq, Iran and North Korea), which have
or seek to acquire weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
The US will maintain military dominance and global
hegemony, and actively seek to promote free market
democracy throughout the developing world, especially
in the Arab and Muslim worlds. Similarly, creating free
market democracies in the Arab and Muslim world will
lead to educational and economic opportunities that will
undermine the appeal of terrorists groups. No region
of the world is more important to US security than the
Arabian Gulf region due to its control of most of the
world’s proven oil reserves. Therefore, the US cannot
allow a hostile power or radical group to control all or
part of that region. To prevent either of these situations,
the US maintains the capability to apply military power
throughout the Arabian Gulf through the maintenance
of bases and forces in the region and surrounding areas.
Preventing Saddam Hussein from controlling Gulf oil
was the primary purpose of the 1991 Gulf war.

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LECTURER

Sunday 6 June 2004

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Sunday 6 June 2004

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