Sharia and Islam

Sharia and Islam

  • 6 March 2013

In Arabic, Islam means acceptance, surrender or voluntary submission. Figuratively, according to jurisconsults’ understanding (Faqihs), Islam means the religion of Almighty Allah, as recorded in the Holy Quran and Sunnah texts. Scholars differed in their understanding of the application of Islam in human history. Some said that it applies to all people of divine religions; others said that it applies only to prophets and those who believe in the religion of the Prophet Mohammed. Ibn Taymiyyah believes that Islam has two connotations, one is general covering all divine religions; the second connotation is unique to the Sharia of the Prophet Mohammed.

In Arabic, Sharia means “the clear, well-trodden path to water.” In Islam, it is used to refer to the details of religion that Allah has legislated for his servants. These details of religion are clarified in Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh), which is defined as “knowledge of Islamic legal rulings in accordance with their sources.”

The origins of Islam are similar in each divine religion—recognizing the pillars of Islam, ruling with justice, good deeds, freedom to kith and kin, and the forbidding all shameful deeds, injustice and rebellion. However, these aspects vary in importance depending upon the stage of human civilization at a particular time. Islamic law is characterized by its flexibility in order to uphold religious ruling as an umbrella for all scholars, and to adapt to developments in societal evolution. Islamic scholars and fundamentalists maintain a distinction between Islamic ruling and Juristic ruling. Among the most important differences in this regard are: unity and plurality, stability and change, infallibility and the possibility of error, and suffering and joy.

Those who wish to study Sharia, jurisprudence, religion, the Holy Quran and Sunnah texts, should desist from speaking in God’s name, not give support to religious rule, promote juristic pluralism, correct religious instruction, commission legal or juristic individuals for the purpose of guidance on Islamic rulings, and to stop the political infiltration of religion.

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Wednesday 6 March 2013

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Wednesday 6 March 2013

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