The GCC after 33 Years: Between Optimism and Pessimism

The GCC after 33 Years: Between Optimism and Pessimism

  • 4 June 2014

The strong political and security challenges and developments in the 1970s and 1980s created conditions that required the Gulf Arab States (UAE, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Kuwait) to find a new political body capable of weathering common challenges facing these countries, and to engage in collective work to overcome the weaknesses of individual countries. Therefore, the collective formation was a deterrent power, albeit symbolic, against various threats.

The birth of the GCC in 1981 in Abu Dhabi (the UAE) stemmed from the idea of forming a sub-regional order seeking to create a single Gulf state based on security, safety, stability and prosperity. In this regard, the lecture delivered here reflects the serious desire for the participation of civil society forces in developing the new functional approach between economic, cultural and academic development, in order to build interacting Gulf societies across the political boundaries of the GCC countries.

The GCC countries have to play a dynamic role in order to create a sound and healthy environment for regional peaceful co-existence with their immediate neighboring countries. This is especially important given the circumstances of the 21st century, which are characterized by political, economic and security blocs and the integration of common interests. The goal of forming a single unitary state could be seen as far-fetched or even impossible. However, the successful experience of the UAE in forming a single entity from seven political units (emirates) encourages us more and more to push for a unified political entity, now or in the foreseeable future.

Lecture’s Video

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LECTURER

Wednesday 4 June 2014

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Wednesday 4 June 2014

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