International Migration: Reality and Prospects

International Migration: Reality and Prospects

  • 2 March 2011

The history of human communities has been linked with migration flows through conquests, state-formation and colonialism. All these factors have created, throughout time, orbits and migration networks which developed according to occasional transformations.

This resulted in the “globalization of migrations” and an increase in the number of countries of origin, host and transit countries. Today, the number of migrants around the world exceeds 200 millions, a 3% of the world population. Arab countries are a field for the movement of this migration.

Due to its importance, migration has become almost a daily topic for the media, which looks at the economic, political and social reasons behind it. This has prompted the United Nations to get involved in this issue. In its meeting during the 61st session of 2006, the world body adopted a resolution which called for holding an annual international forum to tackle international migration issues.

With the formation of important communities – in legal or illegal forms- these have become a key component in the relations between the countries of origin and host countries, especially after the goal of most migrants has been changed from temporary migration to permanent residency. However, despite this transformation, these communities have remained closely connected to their native countries economically, socially and culturally. A rational and constructive analysis of migration requires an approach that takes into consideration the following key factors:

1. The historical dimension and the evaluation of the size and kinds of migration, with a focus on illegal migration and skilled migration, which are the most important kinds of migration in recent years.
2. The reasons and incentives of migration: internal and external reasons (repellent or attractive)
3. Integration problems in the host communities.
4. Migration policies in the countries of origin and host countries.
5. Migration effects on host countries taking into consideration its economic returns and role in covering the deficit in various sectors of the job market. This, on addition to migration effects on exporting countries, where remittances of migrants constitute a key betting on the problematic of migration at both the micro and macro-economic levels.
6. Future Prospects: motivating factors for the institutionalization of the “migration system”: these factors are different and reveal the negative dimensions of migration policies applied by the host countries, for which migration is not only a reality but a necessity, now or in the future.

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Wednesday 2 March 2011

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Wednesday 2 March 2011

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